Sunday, November 2, 2008

Consumer Reports Busts Sunscreens on Nano Particles

I read an interesting article on The Consumerist a few days ago about sunscreens who advertise as Nano Particle free actually contain them. It just never ends. Nano and Micro Particles are also in many forms of makeup these days. These are being linked as causing possible nerve damage since they can enter the bloodstream and travel to the brain.

It makes you wonder exactly what is in our makeup and beauty products. Consumers really don't have a way to verify product ingredients - aside from paying $$$ to have products tested at a lab. The only available home test kits are for lead. A reader brought this up a few weeks ago, wondering if what we were using is actually what is on the ingredients list. I spent hours searching for ways to test cosmetics and it's just not possible without a lab.

"Four of them, all labeled natural or organic, actually did contain nanoparticles: Aubrey Organics Natural Sun SPF 25 Green Tea Protective Sunscreen, Badger SPF 30 Sunscreen, Kiss My Face SPF 30+ Sun Screen with oat protein complex and Mexitan SPF 30 Sunscreen. Only one product—Zinka Colored Nosecoat—turned out to be actually free of the
particles."

Consumer Reports article.


4 comments:

  1. All evidence shows that nanosized particles of zinc oxide in mineral sunscreens do not get absorbed through the skin into deeper tissues or the blood. They are far safer to use than any chemical sunscreens. Just read the Environment Working Groups recent study on sunscreens. The Consumer Reports study has no research backing it up and is nothing more than a scare tactic to sell magazines.

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  2. Yes, but your skin is an organ, too. Nanosized particles cause skin damage, shown in a 2 week study. And, while it may be better than the chemical, consumers should be able to choose depending on their personal concerns and priorities. if labelling is inaccurate, then choice is taken away.

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  3. Just read the Environment Working Groups recent study on sunscreens. The Consumer Reports study has no research backing it up and is nothing more than a scare tactic to sell magazines.

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  4. It's great to see a blog of this quality. I learned a lot of new things and I'm looking forward to see more like this. Thank you.

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